At 3 AM on a July 2012 morning, I lay helpless on an emergency room cot, unable to experience any emotion other than fear and the physical sensations that racked my body. My extreme levels of anxiety did not cease; my body showed me no mercy, perhaps because my racing mind did not extend that courtesy to my body. I was wrapped in a backless hospital gown and meagerly strewn blanket that had been nuked in a microwave to keep me warm. I was uncontrollably shaking and shivering from the inside out. I felt aches and pains and my eyes bulged with fright and confusion. “What is happening to me?” I thought. 
Suma Chand, MPhil, PhD., authors this blog post. What can one do to escape judgment? The best solution would be to avoid people. Another solution that is often used is that of being as correct and perfect as possible so that no deficiency is evident.  While this sounds like a fool proof plan, it is not easy to be so perfect that no judgment comes one’s way.
Jeff Nalin, Psy.D, Founder and Clinical Director, Paradigm Malibu and Paradigm San Francisco authors this blog post. If you have a teenager who uses social media on a daily basis, it’s important you learn how social media can cause depression and other problems. It’s not uncommon for teens to have their smartphones on hand at all times, and being connected with their friends can seem like a positive experience at first. If you want to protect your teenager from harm, it’s time to look at some of the issues that using social media can cause, impacting lives in a powerful way. Teens won’t always seek help when things go wrong online, making them feel even more helpless.
Health Unlocked has just launched an iOS mobile app for iPhones in the US for the ADAA online support community. Now its even easier to connect with others struggling with anxiety & depression.  ADAA’s anonymous, free, peer-to-peer online anxiety and depression support group is a friendly, safe and supportive place for individuals and their families to share information and experiences. As a member you can connect with other people experiencing anxiety and depression and related disorders, contribute to ongoing conversations or start your own conversation with a question or a post about your journey.  
Overcoming Social Anxiety: Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) to Build Self-Confidence and Lessen Self-Consciousness.  Presented by: Larry Cohen, LICSW , Cofounder & Chair, National Social Anxiety Center (NSAC), Director, NSAC District of Columbia.  The webinar provides an introduction to four CBT strategies to help you overcome social anxiety: mindful focus; cognitive restructuring; assertiveness; and experiments.
ADAA and SAVE are proud to announce the release of a new collaborative Suicide Prevention infographic. People who kill themselves exhibit one or more warning signs, either through what they say or do. The more warning signs, the greater the risk. This infographic provides a "quick glance" of tips to help determine if someone is suicidal by understanding the warning signs, knowing the questions to ask, the "do's and don'ts," and how to find help. SAVE (Suicide Awareness Voices of Education) has been the leading suicide prevention organization working to prevent suicide through public awareness and education for nearly 30 years. SAVE's expertise and capacity includes having developed state of the art suicide prevention programming for youth, adults and communities, including an NREPP Evidence-Based Program and research on public awareness that has shaped the field, while also providing leadership around the nation and throughout the world. SAVE works tirelessly to reduce the stigma of suicide, serve as a resource to survivors of loss, and engage those with lived experiences. To learn more about SAVE, visit www.save.org.  Click here to visit ADAA's suicide prevention website page for additional suicide prevention resources.
Since 1949, May has been known as Mental Health Awareness Month.  Each year, when May is over, I wonder why we’re not encouraged to be aware of our mental health all year, every year, just as we are for our so-called physical health. Given all we know about the effects of anxiety and depression on our bodies and immune systems, this question is vital.  As Harvard Health pointed out in 2008, “Anxiety has now been implicated in several chronic physical illnesses, including heart disease, chronic respiratory disorders, and gastrointestinal conditions.” These conditions are no joke, so why don’t we take mental health more seriously?
"Mom and Dad, I am so, so, so sorry for this. Please don’t blame yourself for this but I have decided to take my own life. This has nothing to do with anyone. It is completely my choice. I have had no joy in life for some time now and I feel terrible for being a disappointment to you. I don’t like who I am." These words haunted Mike for months. His 16 year-old son - his bright, athletic, kind, strong boy - had taken his own life. Mike’s son was gone and a part of him died with his boy. A tough-as-nails welder, Mike cried the day he found his son hanging from the rafters of their garage, screamed at God for taking his boy, and railed against himself for somehow letting this happen. But Mike showed his tears to no one, and kept his anger, sorrow, grief, and sense of guilt to himself.
My friend Peter Conrad published a remarkable paper in 1985 entitled The Meaning of Medications: Another look at compliance. Peter is a Professor of Sociology at Brandeis University who is interested in social aspects of health. In his paper, he was trying to understand why people with epilepsy took or did not take their medications. What were their reasons and what were they trying to achieve? In contrast to prior theories of compliance which focused on the doctor-patient relationship, Peter was trying to understand the patient’s experience of taking medication – and he called this “medication practice”, i.e. how did the patient approach the daily practice of taking medication? “Medical practice offers a patient-centered perspective of how people manage their medication, focusing on the meaning and the use of medications”. In other words, he was interested in the relationship between a patient and their medications. Recall that Peter was interested in people with epilepsy. One could imagine that people with epilepsy would, of course, take their medication religiously since their medication would reduce or eliminate their seizures – and who would want to have seizures if they could be avoided? But Peter found something much more interesting.
Looking for relief from anxiety, depression or stress? If you live in one of the 80 million U.S. households with a pet, you may be able to find help right at home in the form of a wet nose or a wagging tail. You can call it the pet effect. Any pet owner will tell you that living with a pet comes with many benefits, including constant companionship, love and affection. It’s also no surprise that 98% of pet owners consider their pet to be a member of the family. Not only are people happier in the presence of animals, they’re also healthier. In a survey of pet owners, 74% of pet owners reported mental health improvements from pet ownership, and 75% of pet owners reported a friend’s or family member’s mental health has improved from pet ownership.