It’s easy to understand how a major car accident would cause someone to fear driving, but most driving phobia have nothing to do with accidents. 
“One of the key issues that consumers ask us about is how to identify warning signs in adolescents regarding anxiety and how to raise the issue with their adolescents.  We get the sense that some parents do not know how to bring up the issue and what language to use when speaking to their children, including what to look for when the kids respond.” Everyone experiences anxiety, but what are the signs for which one should look when it becomes a problem for adolescents?  Read more for some symptoms and behaviors of different types of anxiety disorders for parents to keep in mind.
Social Media outlets like Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram have become a behemoth daily presence in our lives. Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg recently reported there are an astonishing 1.23 billion daily log-ons to the social media giant per day, representing an 18% increase in the last year (as of September, 2016). CEO Evan Spiegel’s app Snapchat offers users an experience where video, photo and text messages are live for only 24 hours- allowing for an instant and fleeting connection between people. This app is wildly popular with the millennial set, and as February 2017, there are 158 million active Snapchat users.
Children of anxious parents are more at risk for developing anxiety disorders. This is because they will have both a genetic predisposition to developing an anxiety disorder and their environment may emphasize hyper vigilance to risk cues.  It is important to emphasize that being at risk for developing an anxiety disorder does not mean with certainty that they will develop one. Creating an emotionally healthy environment where children learn to tackle their fears can prevent the development of an anxiety disorder.
Whether my patients have OCD, social anxiety, a phobia, panic, or are just generally anxious about life, they come into treatment wanting to be free of the uncomfortable feelings associated with anxiety. To rid themselves of their anxiety they have tried meditation, relaxation, yoga, different psychotherapies and medication, but overall they don’t feel a whole lot better. They ask me, “Why am I so anxious?” and “How do I get rid of this anxiety?” And I respond: “You need to allow yourself to be anxious and you don’t need to know why you are anxious.” I know it sounds counterintuitive. But when you actually move toward your anxiety and just allow yourself to experience it, without trying to flee the situation or reason your way out of it, those yucky anxiety feelings and bodily sensations tend to dissipate.
Between the constant messages in the news warning us of doom and gloom and an ever-increasing number of professional and personal obligations, life today is as stressful and anxiety-provoking as ever. Experiencing some stress and anxiety is not only normal but can be useful in small doses (e.g., keeping us alert, focused and ready to take action). Unfortunately, an increasing number of people report finding it so difficult to control stress and anxiety that it causes significant distress and interferes with their ability to function. 
Many Americans are experiencing a higher level of worrying since the presidential election.  Our country is in midst of a big transition and the stakes are high. We don’t know what will happen and uncertainty is worrisome for many. As an anxiety disorder therapist, I’ve worked with many people who worry. Can I apply what works with chronic worriers to political anxiety? Whatever the cause of your worry or level of intensity, the same part of our brains sets worry in motion. The limbic emotional brain perceives threats and alerts us to them. Because it is primitive, instinctual, and totally focused on survival, I call it the monkey mind.
Suicide is one of the most devastating public health problems faced by society today. In the United States, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2015). Over 44,000 Americans take their own lives each year, which works out to about 120 suicides each day, just in the U.S. (CDC, 2015). This means that we are each more likely to die by our own hand than someone else’s (World Health Organization [WHO], 2012). For every suicide death, there are also another 10 to 25 non-fatal suicide attempts (CDC, 2015; Crosby, Gfroerer, Han, Ortega, & Parks, 2011). These statistics are alarming.
Psychiatrists have been using videoconferencing for psychiatric consultations for almost sixty years. Now with the advent of web and cloud based systems, mobile computing, the impact of commercial telemedicine service companies, and a growing body of evidence and research, more and more patients are being treated online.
Dr. Joseph Brand provides an overview of common sleep problems experienced by kids and teens. He covers insomnia, separation anxiety, circadian rhythm problems, and other issues. Dr. Brand reviews the most effective treatment approaches for different age groups, from toddlers and young children to older adolescents.