2018 CDLP Committee Chairs

Paul Holtzheimer headshot_1.jpgDr. Paul Hotzheimer / Board Liaison

Paul Holtzheimer, MD, MSCR, is Deputy Director for Research at the VA’s National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (NCPTSD), Executive Division. He is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Surgery at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Dr. Holtzheimer attended Pacific Lutheran University where he graduated summa cum laude with a B.S. in Biology and B.A. in Philosophy and Psychology. He then attended Dartmouth Medical School, graduating with honors. He completed his psychiatry residency at the University of Washington School of Medicine followed by a clinical research fellowship in transcranial magnetic stimulation. He then joined the faculty of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Emory University School of Medicine where he developed further expertise in treatment-resistant mood and anxiety disorders, brain imaging techniques and brain stimulation therapies (such as transcranial magnetic stimulation [TMS], electroconvulsive therapy [ECT], and deep brain stimulation [DBS]). In his current position, Dr. Holtzheimer oversees and helps coordinate the research activities throughout the NCPTSD. His independent research program is focused on the neurobiology and treatment of PTSD and treatment-resistant mood disorders. Current methodologies include functional and structural neuroimaging and focal neuromodulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation. Dr. Holtzheimer is faculty in the Neurosciences Division of the Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine (PEMM). Clinically, Dr. Holtzheimer provides evaluation and consultation for patients with treatment-resistant mood disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and the White River Junction VAMC. Dr. Holtzheimer is an author on over 80 publications in psychiatry, neurosurgery and neuroimaging. He has been an investigator on several clinical trials of novel treatments for mood and anxiety disorders, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and deep brain stimulation, as well as numerous studies investigating the structural and functional neuroanatomy of mood and anxiety disorders. He is a member of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the International Society for Trauma and Stress Studies, and the Society of Biological Psychiatry. .

Kimberly-Morrow_1.jpgMs. Kimberly Morrow / Chair Practice

Ms Kimberly Morrow received a Masters in Psychology from Memphis State University and a Masters in Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is the chair of the Alies Muskin Clinical Leadership and Development Program for the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and is on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Obsessive Compulsive Foundation of Northwestern Pennsylvania ( www.iocdf.org ).

Kimberly Morrow is a Behavior Therapy Institute graduate from the International Obsessive Compulsive Foundation and has had extensive training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy including Exposure and Response Prevention. She is passionate about training others to treat anxiety including providing workshops and supervision. Kimberly has developed a training video for the Anxiety and Depression Association of America to train graduate students as well as anxiety treatment courses through PESI.

Kimberly Morrow also provides Wellness workshops to teach complementary ways to manage stress and symptoms in your life.

ressler_cropped_0.jpgDr. Kerry Ressler / Chair Basic Neuroscience

Kerry J. Ressler, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School and the James and Patricia Poitras Chair in Psychiatry, Chief Scientific Officer, and Chief of the Division of Depression and Anxiety Disorders at McLean Hospital. He began this role in August, 2015, after serving at Emory University in Atlanta for 18 years.

Dr. Ressler is also the 2017 President of the US Society for Biological Psychiatry. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in molecular biology from M.I.T., and his M.D./Ph.D. from Harvard Medical School. In 1992 at Harvard, Dr. Ressler was the first student of Dr. Linda Buck (Nobel Prize, 2004), helping to identify the molecular organization of the olfactory receptor system.

Dr. Ressler is a previous Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a current member of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the IOM). His work focuses on translational research bridging molecular neurobiology in animal models with human genetic research on emotion, particularly fear and anxiety disorders.

Dr. Ressler has published over 250 manuscripts ranging from basic molecular mechanisms of fear processing to understanding how emotion is encoded in a region of the brain called the amygdala, in both animal models and human patients.

Craighead Headshot.jpgDr. Ed Craighead / Chair Clinical Research

Dr. Craighead received his doctorate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1970. Beginning in 1970, he rose through the academic ranks to become Professor of Psychology in 1979 at Pennsylvania State University, where he served for many years as Director of Clinical Training. He became a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center in 1986 and was also Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training. In 1995, he moved to the University of Colorado at Boulder where he was Professor, Director of Clinical Training, and Department Chair (2003-2006). In 2006, he moved to Emory University where he is a Professor of Psychology and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. At Emory, he holds the J. Rex Fuqua Chair and is the Director of the Child and Adolescent Mood Program (CAMP).

Dr. Craighead’s research, which focuses on mood disorders, has been funded for several years by NIMH and private Foundations. Over the past three decades, his work has focused on cognitive behavioral models of Major Depression and Bipolar Disorders. Currently, his primary work focuses on differential predictors of response and relapse among depressed patients being treated for the first time. In the adult studies, he is investigating patterns of neural connectivity, personality disorders, and several genetic markers as differential predictors of response and relapse following treatment with duloxetine, escitalopram, and cognitive behavior therapy. Similar work with depressed adolescents is comparing the differential prediction of acute treatment effects for fluoxetine and behavioral activation. He continues to work on the prevention of the first episode of depression with his colleague Eirikur Arnarson in Iceland, and they have recently begun work on a similar prevention study in Portugal. He and his colleague, David Miklowitz, and his wife, Linda Craighead who is an Emory Professor of Psychology, have recently published a graduate level Psychopathology book.

Full 2018 CDLP Committee

Board Liaison

Paul Holtzheimer, MD, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth  Practice

Practice

Kimberly Morrow, LCSW, Chair
Stan Arkow, MD, Columbia University
Rebecca Sachs, PhD, CBT Spectrum

Basic Neuroscience

Danny Pine, MD, NIMH
Kerry Ressler, MD, PhD, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Clinical Research

Ed Craighead, PhD, Emory University
Alicia Meuret, PhD, Southern Methodist University

ADAA Staff Liaison

Helen Heymann

2017 CDLP Committee

Practice

Kimberly Morrow, LCSW, Chair
Stan Arkow, MD, Columbia University
Rebecca Sachs, PhD, CBT Spectrum

Basic Neuroscience

Daniel Pine, MD National Institute of Mental Health
Kerry Ressler, MD, PhD, Harvard Medical School 
Ned Kalin, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

Clinical Research

Ed Craighead,PhD, Emory University 
Alicia Meuret, PhD, Southern Methodist University