by Arash Javanbakht, MD

Imagine one morning you wake up to a loud sound of explosion, and in disbelief find out the whole city is in chaos. There is no electricity, no tap water, grocery stores are closed indefinitely, and there is no gas for the car.

by Sheila A. M. Rauch, PhD, ABPP

With the deluge of information on this event, it is highly likely that your children, preteens, and teens have heard a lot about the event and may have even seen some of the video coverage of the shooting itself and the aftermath.

by Sheila Rauch, PhD

With the deluge of information on this event, it is highly likely that your children, preteens, and teens have heard a lot about the event and may have even seen some of the highly graphic video coverage of the shooting itself and the aftermath.  The key message for parents to convey after exposu

by Debra Kissen & Michelle Lozano

There is no right way to handle trauma. Each individual moves at their own speed and has their own readiness to confront pain and suffering.

by Karen Cassiday

No parent has adequate words to explain the destruction that nature causes.  When our children ask us the big questions, such as “Why?” or “What is going to happen next?” after a flood, earthquake or hurricane has destroyed their home, community or disrupted daily life, adults can get stuck think