ADAA member Justin Dainer Best is quoted in this article that highlights a study authored by a team of scientists from Texas analyzing electrical brainwaves. The study has found that depressed people are drawn to negative information in a way that non-depressed people are not. Their new findings are published in Biological Psychology.  
Ken Goodman, LCSW, explains the pervasive nature of Emetophobia – the fear of vomiting – the vicious cycle which keeps sufferers trapped, and the strategy for conquering this all-consuming fear. 
Samantha Thornton recently faced the loss of her brother Andy and partnered with ADAA to present a unique and powerful 3-part blog series that she wrote to share her personal perspective. Our hope is that Samantha’s story will help others experiencing loss and grief. Part 3 is shared here.
Samantha Thornton recently faced the loss of her brother Andy and partnered with ADAA to present a unique and powerful 3-part blog series that she wrote to share her personal perspective. Our hope is that Samantha’s story will help others experiencing loss and grief. Part 2 is shared here.
There is no right way to handle trauma. Each individual moves at their own speed and has their own readiness to confront pain and suffering. Unfortunately, there is no way to expedite the process of healing from trauma. The human condition is simply hard and comes jam-packed with suffering. The good news is that the intensity of emotional pain always reduces with time. This is not just a trite sentiment, as there are neurological studies that have found the ways the brain works to heal emotional wounds. The brain is geared for survival and is always looking for new threats and information, which means old experiences eventually route to the back of the line to direct your attentional resources to what is new and potentially important.
ADAA member Michael Thase, MD, authors this article on solving clinical challenges in major depression. 
For those who lose a loved one to suicide the pain never goes away.  Samantha Thornton recently experienced the loss of her brother Andy and has partnered with ADAA to present a unique, candid and powerful 3-part blog series that she wrote to share her personal perspective. Our hope is that Samantha’s story will help others experiencing loss and grief. Part 1 is shared here.
ADAA member Franklin Schneier, MD, is quoted in this article regarding different ways psychologists handle anxiety 
ADAA member Anne Marie Albano, PhD., shares her insights on handling anxiety in this article. 
ADAA President Karen Cassiday, PhD., shares her insights on the difference between feeling anxious and having anxiety in this article.