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ADAA public blog posts address frequently asked questions about psychological and pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders, depression, and related disorders for adults as well as children. ADAA blog posts are written by our expert professional members and offer tips and other helpful information. You can search (please see search option to the right of this page) by keyword or by population. The most recent blog posts are those that appear at the top of this page. As each blog post is also comment enabled, we invite you to share your thoughts to further the conversation. Interested in a particular topic? Have a suggestion for our next blog post? Interested in viewing our blog post guidelines? Please contact us.

by Jennifer Shannon, LMFT

My client Tom had been working from home since the pandemic hit in March, but now his boss had set a date for returning to the office, in only three weeks. Tom felt anxious about prolonged exposure to his co-workers, as his partner had an underlying health condition.

by Paul Greene, PhD

Many parents around the country are being faced with deciding whether or not to have their children return to school — whether it be part-time or full-time — for the upcoming school year.

by Richa Bhatia, MD, FAPA

The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly and abruptly changed human life in unexpected ways. In the last few months, since the COVID-19 stay at home restrictions came into place, millions of people have been working from home and practicing social distancing.

by Stefanie Russman Block, PhD

Today I said thank you to the staff at the senior living facility where my 97-year-old grandmother lives.  At the outbreak of COVID-19, she found herself hospitalized with bacterial pneumonia – nothing related to COVID-19.  Just poor timing.  

by Ken Goodman, LCSW

The illness you fear might not be the illness you have.

by Mbemba Jabbi, PhD and Kathariya Mokrue, PhD

Racial and related inequities have immensely traumatized Black and Brown citizens of the United States for centuries.

by Michelle Witkin, PhD

Images of the murder of Black Americans, discussions about systemic racism, sirens blaring, crowds protesting, curfews, fires. It’s tough for adults to make sense of the hurt in the world right now, but how do we help our children and teens with it?

by Natalia Skritskaya, PhD and M. Katherine Shear, MD

Grief is a natural multifaceted reaction to loss.

We all have the capacity to adapt to even the most difficult loss.

Recognize that grief contains love; try to let it in and not push it away. 

by Jennifer Shannon, LMFT

In the grocery store, you are told to stand back on the red line. You feel ashamed for not seeing it in the first place.

You tell your in-laws you are not comfortable having them visit their grandchildren in person, and you worry that they may never forgive you. 

by Angelina F. Gomez, MA and Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD

Feeling anxious, worried, and tense? You are not alone!

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