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by Steve Wilson
Have you ever seen a person walking on a tightrope suspended 150 feet above a deep gorge? What do they strive for most? Balance! That’s exactly what someone suffering from bipolar disorder requires most in their life.
by Adam Meyers
There are many different coping strategies people may use after experiencing trauma. They may be good and healthy, or they may be bad and unhealthy. My coping strategies were bad, unhealthy, self-destructive, and dangerous.
by Vedant Vyas
Despite seeing so many doctors, nothing concrete was coming out in the medical diagnosis. Slowly and steadily, I crafted a strategy to fight the situation. I believed that all these negativities around me can be overcome by positivity and focusing on the good things.
by Scott O'Connor

Hi to all who struggle every day. I've been struggling with anxiety, panic attacks and depression for most my life. I have been struggling since I was a child with these disorders and have seen terrible downward spirals. I couldn't get along in school or work and keep a job to support myself, a hell of a long road that nearly never ends. And I just had to put down the best little dog anyone has ever seen.

by Jordan Moore
This song is dedicated and directed to those who suffer from the condition commonly known as anxiety. As someone suffering from anxiety, I have found art as my outlet to express my feelings and combat my condition. 
by Kyle Mitchell
You might think being able to strategize is a good thing, but when it involves hours and hours of time thinking of ways to get out of having to ask a question, give a presentation, speak up in class, and generally avoid most social interaction, it can be detrimental.

Share Your Story and Your Voice.

Help #breakthestigma Around Mental Health.

Read Stories From People Just Like You.

We invite you to explore ADAA's community's personal stories to learn how people living with anxiety, depressive, obsessive-compulsive, and trauma-related disorders have struggled, coped, and triumphed. 

 

Do you have a story about your mental health journey? Your voice and your story can help transform the lives of many, help decrease stigma, and make one feel less alone. And if you are a member of the BIPOC and/or LGBTQ+ community please we would love to hear from you!

 

We welcome written stories and short 2-3 minute videos, or a 1-2 minute recording, that we will share on the ADAA website, through our Triumph e-newsletter, and across our social media platforms. 

 

In a story of 500 -750 words (or a 2-3 minute video), please describe your experience with an anxiety disorder and/or depression and how it has affected your life. Please provide a brief title and focus on the therapy or other treatments that have helped you manage or overcome your illness. Please include how ADAA's website or resources have helped you. In order to publish you story on our website and to share it on our social media platforms, we require that you use your real name and include a photo.

 

Please note that we do not accept advertorials (these stories should not include any call-outs for personal websites or publications or sell any products). We reserve the right to reject any story that we do not feel is appropriate to share. 

 

SUBMIT YOUR STORY


NOTE: ADAA reserves the right to edit for clarity, length, and editorial style. We do not guarantee that every submission will be published. If your story is accepted, you will be notified. If you have not heard from ADAA within one week of submission that means that your story has not been accepted. Once your story is posted on this website, it is the property of ADAA.
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Have you ever seen a person walking on a tightrope suspended 150 feet above a deep gorge? What do…