ADAA member Shane Owens, PhD, ABPP teamed up with Her Campus to create two surveys to see what anxiety looks like at the college level.
“Often people who have a purely seasonal form of depression, it may be on the mild side,” says ADAA member James Murrough, MD in this article on seasonal depression.
ADAA member Karmel Choi, PhD's study featured in ADAA's Depression and Anxiety journal analyzing data from nearly 8,000 people found that those with a genetic predisposition were more likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next two years is highlighed in this WebMD article. "Our findings strongly suggest that, when it comes to depression, genes are not destiny and that being physically active has the potential to neutralize the added risk of future episodes in individuals who are genetically vulnerable," said lead author Karmel Choi. She is a clinical fellow in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.
“Employees may be less likely to take advantage of mental health days due to the perceived stigma associated with mental health,” says ADAA member Kevin Chapman, PhD in this article about how often to take a mental health day.
In a study published today in Depression and Anxiety, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) found that incorporating more physical activity — whether high-intensity dance, aerobic, or machines to more low-intensity yoga or walks — for 4 hours per week (or approximately 35 minutes per day) can help decrease the chances of depressive episodes by 17 percent....“Depression is a major public health problem and a major source of suffering for people, and the study found that it’s a fact that something like physical activity may have protective effects,” said Dr. Jordan Smoller, senior author and associate chief for research at MGH’s Department of Psychiatry and professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School - and ADAA member.
Among people with a genetic predisposition for depression, 4 additional hours of physical activity may reduce the odds of incident depression by 17%, according to results of a biobank cohort study published in Depression & Anxiety. “Depression runs in families and has a strong genetic component, and patients with these risk factors may believe there is little they can do to avoid becoming depressed,” Karmel Choi, PhD, clinical and research fellow at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (and ADAA member), told Healio Psychiatry. “Our findings suggest otherwise. We saw that being active still makes a difference regardless of genetic risk. This study may help inform the discussion between patients and their health care provider about what pre-existing risk factors they have on board and, importantly, what they can do about it.”
"Our findings strongly suggest that, when it comes to depression, genes are not destiny and that being physically active has the potential to neutralize the added risk of future episodes in individuals who are genetically vulnerable," study lead author Karmel Choi, postdoctoral fellow in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital (and ADAA member) said in a statement. The study is published today (Nov. 5) in the journal Depression and Anxiety. (ADAA's online journal).
ADAA member Alicia Clark, PsyD authors this article on when to worry about your teen's anxiety. 
"If a person is on the fence about seeking treatment and one sibling or parent speaks negatively about it, that could be the deciding factor that ultimately prevents them from getting help," says ADAA member Michelle Lozano, MFT in this article about mental health stigma. 
ADAA member Douglas Mennin, PhD is featured in this Washington Post article on excessive worrying.