by Erica Riba and Diana Cusumano

The Jed Foundation's JED Campus advisors, Erica Riba, LCSW and Diana Cusumano, LHMC, NCC will talk about depression in college students today and how the JED Campus program and other outside resources can help those who are struggling and learn skills to reach out to others.
 

by Beth Salcedo, MD – ADAA Board President

What You Need to Know About Treatment and Medication Options 

by Luana Marques, PhD

Intimate partner violence (IPV) takes place in all settings, in all socioeconomic, religious, ethnic, and cultural groups. The overwhelming global burden of IPV is endured by women, and the most common perpetrators of violence against women are male intimate partners or ex-partners.

by Sarah A. Hayes-Skelton, PhD and David W. Pantalone, PhD

People who identify as sexual (i.e., lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer) or gender (i.e., transgender, genderqueer, non-binary) minorities have similar symptoms of anxiety and depression as heterosexual and cisgender (non-transgender) individuals.

by Jackie K Gollan, Ph.D. Northwestern University

Dr. Jackie Gollan is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Obstetrics and Gynecology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

by Kevin Lynch

My son Nick has battled mental illness since he was a child. He was incarcerated at 18 where his condition deteriorated without access to necessary medical care and treatment.

by Katherine Bengan

While we all can experience anxiety and depression at times, if it becomes disruptive to your life, it is time to take it seriously. If you are so anxious that you cannot leave your house, for example, this is a sign of anxiety disorder and needs to be treated.

by Chris Gilbert, MD, PhD

Chris Gilbert, MD, PhD Holistic Medicine Physician. Dr. Gilbert is a speaker and author of “The Listening Cure: Healing Secrets of an Unconventional Doctor” (SelectBooks 2017) and “The French Stethoscope” (a memoir) Iuniverse 2010, and is an active member of Doctors Without Borders.

by Marie Miguel

Everyone feels sad once in a while but if you feel sad for more than two weeks, you may have a condition called clinical depression. This is a very common mental health disorder that can affect anyone of any age at any time but is most common in women in their late 20s and early 30s.

by Patricia Thornton, PhD

So, you’re a failure. Fine. Get on with your life! In my work as a psychologist treating anxiety disorders, I’ve learned that often an underlying driving fear in my patients is the worry that they are failures.

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