Anxiety Disorders

In contrast to more traditional psychological approaches, positive psych concerns itself with the good stuff in life. It strives to understand what makes for a good life and how we can not only maintain average or ‘normal’ functioning but how we can actually surpass it. Positive psychology focuses on building strengths and on maximizing wellbeing. In a word, it’s all about thriving. 
One of the biggest adversities children have faced in quarantine is social isolation from their peers. Schooling and extracurricular activities associated with long-term education plans were the first to go during the shutdown, as the highest priority was to protect children from the spread of the virus. While necessary for the safety of the public, this has shown to have devastating effects on pediatric mental health.

Another school year has come around and with it, the possibility of extreme fear and separation anxiety for some children.

As the school year begins, children who normally go through separation anxiety may be even more anxious about going back into the classroom during the pandemic.

As summer heat waves break records across the country, many kids and teens have already started preparations for the upcoming school year.

We are all affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in some way, and helping our students return to school in the fall will take a lot of emotional strength.
But what should those of us fortunate enough to be vaccinated return to? I didn’t exactly feel euphoric each day in my normal life pre-COVID-19. How should you choose what to rebuild, what to leave behind and what new paths to try for the first time? Clinical psychological science provides some helpful clues for how to chart your course out of pandemic life.
As the U.S. vaccination rate increases and COVID-19 rates decrease, the question on everyone’s mind is “When will things go back to normal?” Secondarily, a majority of people follow that question with “Why am I so nervous about returning to normal?”

April is world autism awareness month, and so there is no better time to bring to light not only the challenges associated with autism, but also the most common conditions that impact this community.

Anxiety is one of the most common mental health disorders affecting those on the autism spectrum. Anxiety can cause extreme fear, dread, sweating, restlessness, and even chest pain. “A lot of us do experience anxiety, and we struggle with it in our own ways,” says Jairo E.

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