by Eda Gorbis,PhD, LMFT and Evelyn Dubon, MS

What is OCD? OCD is composed of two components: obsessions and compulsions.  Obsessions are recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images. The thoughts, impulses, or images are not excessive worries about real-life problems.

by Elizabeth McIngvale, PhD

There are clear treatment standards for the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) which offer impressive outcomes and allows individuals to return to high-levels of functioning.

by Cali Werner, MA, LMSW

Successful athletes are driven and determined to perform to their greatest ability.

by Eda Gorbis, PhD

What is OCD? OCD is composed of two components: obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images. The thoughts, impulses, or images are not excessive worries about real-life problems.

by Michelle Witkin, PhD

Sometimes parents who seek consultation with me about their child’s worries or fears are surprised to learn that the child has Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

“But she doesn’t wash her hands all the time…”

by Lynne S. Gots, PhD

In the past few weeks, two people have contacted me seeking help for “real-Iife OCD.” I had never heard the term before, which is surprising because I am an OCD specialist. I spend roughly 75-80% of my clinical hours working with people who have OCD.

by Patrick McGrath, PhD

My newest way to explain OCD to a patient and family.

by Patricia Thornton, PhD

One of the more difficult symptoms of OCD that my patients deal with is the presence of mental compulsions.

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