Tips for Building Resilience in Students and Early Career Professionals During COVID-19

Tips for Building Resilience in Students and Early Career Professionals During COVID-19

Krystal Lewis, PhD - ADAA Board Member

Member Since 2011

Krystal Lewis, PhD is a clinical psychologist with the Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience (SDAN) at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). In addition, she is a member of the Stigma Scientific Interest Group (SIG) and the Anti-Racism Task Force at NIH. She specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric anxiety and has interest in identifying mechanisms of treatment for anxiety disorders in youth. Dr. Lewis has experience in delivering evidence-based therapies and collaborating with schools, families, and providers to disseminate scientific information which helps inform clinical practice and promote implementation of evidence-based treatments.

Dr. Lewis has been an active member of ADAA since 2008. She was selected for the competitive Alies Muskin Career Development Leadership Program (CDLP) in 2015 and is an ADAA Clinical Fellow. She has also held leadership positions within ADAA, previously serving as co-chair of the Early Career Professionals and Student SIG and currently serving as co-chair of the Child and Adolescent SIG and was named to the ADAA Board of Directors in 2021.

Dr. Lewis and ADAA

“My graduate school advisor, Thomas H. Ollendick, encouraged his students to join ADAA and doing so was such a great decision. ADAA has been my professional home since 2008 and during that time I have presented posters and talks at the annual conferences, participated in the Career Development Leadership program (CDLP), co-chaired Special Interests Groups (SIG), mentored with the CDLP, and volunteered to help with several other endeavors. ADAA is an amazing organization and a provides great opportunities for young professionals to volunteer, network, and experience immense professional growth. I’m excited to continue working with ADAA as my own professional goals align nicely with the organizations mission.

I really enjoy the collaboration with professionals around the country. ADAA provides an opportunity to learn about research by attending talks at the conference, participating in webinars, and reading about new insights via email or social media. I especially enjoy the relationships that have developed from participating with the different SIGs. The Child and Adolescent SIG has monthly peer consultation calls which allows us to engage with specialists within our organization and obtain clinical consultation for challenging, unique cases. It’s a space for clinicians at all stages of development to talk with one another, share insightful tips and tools, and be part of a community of providers who are passionate about providing the best clinical care to children and adolescents.

Being an active ADAA member contributes to my work in a variety of ways. I have at hand a group of professionals whom I can call on when I need clinical advice, researchers who I can collaborate with on projects or involve in SIG meetings to present their work, and a professional home where I feel most comfortable. I encourage students and trainees to join this organization which will contribute to their professional growth and maintain their excitement about their work.”

Ashley Clausen, PhD

Ashley Clausen, PhD

Member Since 2015

Dr. Ashley Clausen, Ph.D. is a Staff Clinical Health Psychologist at the Kansas City VA Medical Center. She completed her doctoral training at the University of Tulsa and Laureate Institute for Brain Research with an emphasis in neuropsychology and neuroimaging. Dr. Clausen completed her clinical residency at the Durham VA Health Care System and her post-doctoral fellowship at the VA VISN 6 Mental Illness, Research, Education and Clinical Center and Duke University Brain Imaging and Analysis Center. Dr. Clausen’s research has primarily focused on the neurobiology, brain function and treatment of PTSD in trauma exposed populations. Dr. Clausen has been a member of ADAA since 2012 and was a CDLP – Basic Neuroscience Track recipient in 2017. She served as the co-vice chair of the Early Career SIG in 2018 and is presently servicing as the co-chair. She is looking forward to continued engagement in the ADAA community!

Dr. Clausen and ADAA

“I joined ADAA in 2013 during my first year of graduate school. My graduate school mentor, Dr. Robin Aupperle, provided an incredible opportunity for me to attend ADAA’s annual conference in 2013. My experience at the conference highlighted the strong commitment of ADAA towards early career professionals in anxiety, depression, and trauma-focused disciplines and provided a supportive outlet for professional development. ADAA has been one of the few communities that has provided interdisciplinary opportunities combining my interests in neurobiology, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. ADAA quickly became my professional home and I became more and more involved in the ADAA community. My involvement in ADAA has not only increased my professional network, but my own confidence and expertise as a scientist-practitioner, as well through online trainings and seminars. In 2018 I joined the Early Career SIG leadership and further expanded my appreciation for all ADAA has to offer to its community! I look forward to cutting-edge research, having really excellent and stimulating conversations with experts in the field every year at the annual conference!”

Amanda Baker, PhD

Member Since 2010

Dr. Amanda Baker is a research and clinical psychologist at the Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders at Massachusetts General Hospital and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Baker received her Ph.D. from Boston University and completed her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Dr. Baker is an active member of several professional societies such as the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. 

Dr. Baker's clinical and research interests involve mediators and moderators of the etiology of and cognitive behavioral treatments for anxiety. She recently completed a two-year grant from Harvard Catalyst/The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center/National Institutes of Health to study intra-individual networks of panic disorder in hopes of being able to personalize CBT treatments in the future. She was recently awarded a NARSAD Young Investigator Award from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. She has been trained in a variety of evidence-based assessment methods and cognitive behavioral therapies for anxiety, mood, OC-spectrum and traumatic stress disorders. Dr. Baker was previously awarded a Livingston Fellowship for Young Investigators from Harvard Medical School to conduct research on anxiety sensitivity and suicidality in OC-spectrum and anxiety disorders. She has numerous published peer-reviewed papers and chapters on these topics. 

Dr. Baker and ADAA

 “I joined ADAA in grad school in 2010 as the organization is extremely well aligned with my clinical and research interests. I am continually impressed by the multidisciplinary approaches used and presented by ADAA researchers and clinicians. The annual conferences are a highlight for me! I first went to the conference in 2010 and have been every year since. I have gotten involved in a number of ADAA activities, committees, and award programs outside of general membership which have been invaluable to me. One specific example comes from the CDLP program which I participated in in 2016 and helped me to refine a grant proposal which was subsequently funded!”

Dr. Amanda Baker is a research and clinical psychologist and Clinical Director at the Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders in the Psychiatry Department at Massachusetts General Hospital and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School where she has worked since 2013. Dr. Baker received her Ph.D. from Boston University in 2013 and completed her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Dr. Baker is an active member of Anxiety and Depression Association of America where she is vice-chair of the Early Career Special Interest Group. Dr. Baker's clinical and research interests focus on the development, validation, and dissemination of empirically based psychosocial treatments for anxiety and related disorders. She has a current NARSAD Young Investigator Award from the Brain and Behavior Foundation examining the use of ecological momentary assessment and wearable psychophysiological assessment to develop intra-individual networks of panic disorder and assess change in CBT."

Alex Bettis, PhD

Alex Bettis PhD

Alex Bettis, PhD, is a second-year postdoctoral fellow in the Child Mental Health T32 program at Brown Medical School, and she will be starting a new position this fall as an Assistant Professor in the Psychiatry department at Vanderbilt Medical School. Alex received her PhD from Vanderbilt University in 2018, and she completed her predoctoral clinical internship at UCLA Semel Institute in the general child track. Her clinical and research interests are in the treatment and prevention of internalizing disorders and suicidality in adolescents. Alex has been a member of ADAA for several years, including attending the conference as a part of the Ailes Muskin Career Development Leadership Program in 2019.  

Tips for Building Resilience in Students and Early Career Professionals During COVID-19

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The COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant disruption and stress for everyone. Fear and anxiety can be overwhelming but completely normal reactions to challenging situations that involve danger and uncertainty. Coping with stress can help students and early career professionals manage during these times. 

This is a reminder that each and every one of you are GREAT so remember to engage in G.R.E.A.T practices to help manage feelings of stress and being overwhelmed: 

G. Be Grateful 
R. Practice Relaxation 
E. Engage in Exercise 
A. Acknowledge your feelings 
T. Track Thoughts and challenge them 

The theme for the 2020 Early Career Professionals and Students SIG lunch was resilience. Here is a note from one of our featured speakers: 

“Trust that the challenges are there to teach you something and help you grow. Little did I know that we were all about to face this current challenge. I am wondering what you are learning about yourself and your life through this? I am learning that peace is my strength. Every day I meditate to find a few minutes of peace and bring that into my day. When there are spaces in my day that are quiet, I pause to soak up a bit more peace. This has allowed me to be present for my family and my clients in a way that isn't rushed and isn't stressed (rushed and stressed had become a way I experienced my days prior to this quarantine). I hope you are finding small but significant ways that this time has changed you. May we carry this new learning with us, even after this challenge has passed”   ~Kimberly Morrow, LCSW

Listed below are a few strategies to help promote resilience during these tough times: 

1. Change your expectations of daily productivity and accept that this is your norm right now. Acknowledge you have different demands at home vs. in the lab (family, kids, self-care.,etc.).

2. Limit comparisons to labmates, colleagues, and peers who seem to be working efficiently and finishing papers, brainstorming new ideas, and/or developing research findings. Remember that everyone may have very different circumstances at home right now. 

3. Focus on what IS in your control. We don’t know when we will return to the lab, classroom, clinic, etc. and therefore we need to attend to what we do have control over. Create deadlines for yourself to work on papers, plan classes for the semester/summer, organize data, and/or complete analyses. Again, always go back to number 1- your demands may be different now, and that’s okay! 

4. Acknowledge and validate your thoughts and feelings. Pay attention to your own physical and mental fatigue. There is no right or wrong way to feel during these challenging times. 

5. Engage in mini breaks throughout the day which can help with productivity (e.g. watch a funny show, take a walk, engage on social media, call a loved one, just take a minute to detach from the pressures of work). Giving yourself a break can help with productivity and improve mental health.  

6. Use relaxation strategies to help reduce your anxiety throughout the day (e.g., deep breathing, visualization, body scanning, meditation).

7. Maintain a regular schedule/routine during the work week. This can help with your productivity and managing your time more efficiently. This schedule may take many forms and may be a shared schedule with a partner or a schedule balancing child/elder care and work. 

8. Ask for help! We may feel that we are expected to solve our own problems and figure things out, but these are unchartered waters for everyone. Ask for support when needed whether it be extra time on a project/paper, support from a colleague, tips for your online teaching, or reaching out for professional help from a therapist. 

Learn more about ADAA's Early Career Professionals and Students SIG.

Krystal Lewis, PhD - ADAA Board Member

Member Since 2011

Krystal Lewis, PhD is a clinical psychologist with the Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience (SDAN) at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). In addition, she is a member of the Stigma Scientific Interest Group (SIG) and the Anti-Racism Task Force at NIH. She specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric anxiety and has interest in identifying mechanisms of treatment for anxiety disorders in youth. Dr. Lewis has experience in delivering evidence-based therapies and collaborating with schools, families, and providers to disseminate scientific information which helps inform clinical practice and promote implementation of evidence-based treatments.

Dr. Lewis has been an active member of ADAA since 2008. She was selected for the competitive Alies Muskin Career Development Leadership Program (CDLP) in 2015 and is an ADAA Clinical Fellow. She has also held leadership positions within ADAA, previously serving as co-chair of the Early Career Professionals and Student SIG and currently serving as co-chair of the Child and Adolescent SIG and was named to the ADAA Board of Directors in 2021.

Dr. Lewis and ADAA

“My graduate school advisor, Thomas H. Ollendick, encouraged his students to join ADAA and doing so was such a great decision. ADAA has been my professional home since 2008 and during that time I have presented posters and talks at the annual conferences, participated in the Career Development Leadership program (CDLP), co-chaired Special Interests Groups (SIG), mentored with the CDLP, and volunteered to help with several other endeavors. ADAA is an amazing organization and a provides great opportunities for young professionals to volunteer, network, and experience immense professional growth. I’m excited to continue working with ADAA as my own professional goals align nicely with the organizations mission.

I really enjoy the collaboration with professionals around the country. ADAA provides an opportunity to learn about research by attending talks at the conference, participating in webinars, and reading about new insights via email or social media. I especially enjoy the relationships that have developed from participating with the different SIGs. The Child and Adolescent SIG has monthly peer consultation calls which allows us to engage with specialists within our organization and obtain clinical consultation for challenging, unique cases. It’s a space for clinicians at all stages of development to talk with one another, share insightful tips and tools, and be part of a community of providers who are passionate about providing the best clinical care to children and adolescents.

Being an active ADAA member contributes to my work in a variety of ways. I have at hand a group of professionals whom I can call on when I need clinical advice, researchers who I can collaborate with on projects or involve in SIG meetings to present their work, and a professional home where I feel most comfortable. I encourage students and trainees to join this organization which will contribute to their professional growth and maintain their excitement about their work.”

Ashley Clausen, PhD

Ashley Clausen, PhD

Member Since 2015

Dr. Ashley Clausen, Ph.D. is a Staff Clinical Health Psychologist at the Kansas City VA Medical Center. She completed her doctoral training at the University of Tulsa and Laureate Institute for Brain Research with an emphasis in neuropsychology and neuroimaging. Dr. Clausen completed her clinical residency at the Durham VA Health Care System and her post-doctoral fellowship at the VA VISN 6 Mental Illness, Research, Education and Clinical Center and Duke University Brain Imaging and Analysis Center. Dr. Clausen’s research has primarily focused on the neurobiology, brain function and treatment of PTSD in trauma exposed populations. Dr. Clausen has been a member of ADAA since 2012 and was a CDLP – Basic Neuroscience Track recipient in 2017. She served as the co-vice chair of the Early Career SIG in 2018 and is presently servicing as the co-chair. She is looking forward to continued engagement in the ADAA community!

Dr. Clausen and ADAA

“I joined ADAA in 2013 during my first year of graduate school. My graduate school mentor, Dr. Robin Aupperle, provided an incredible opportunity for me to attend ADAA’s annual conference in 2013. My experience at the conference highlighted the strong commitment of ADAA towards early career professionals in anxiety, depression, and trauma-focused disciplines and provided a supportive outlet for professional development. ADAA has been one of the few communities that has provided interdisciplinary opportunities combining my interests in neurobiology, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. ADAA quickly became my professional home and I became more and more involved in the ADAA community. My involvement in ADAA has not only increased my professional network, but my own confidence and expertise as a scientist-practitioner, as well through online trainings and seminars. In 2018 I joined the Early Career SIG leadership and further expanded my appreciation for all ADAA has to offer to its community! I look forward to cutting-edge research, having really excellent and stimulating conversations with experts in the field every year at the annual conference!”

Amanda Baker, PhD

Member Since 2010

Dr. Amanda Baker is a research and clinical psychologist at the Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders at Massachusetts General Hospital and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Baker received her Ph.D. from Boston University and completed her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Dr. Baker is an active member of several professional societies such as the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. 

Dr. Baker's clinical and research interests involve mediators and moderators of the etiology of and cognitive behavioral treatments for anxiety. She recently completed a two-year grant from Harvard Catalyst/The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center/National Institutes of Health to study intra-individual networks of panic disorder in hopes of being able to personalize CBT treatments in the future. She was recently awarded a NARSAD Young Investigator Award from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. She has been trained in a variety of evidence-based assessment methods and cognitive behavioral therapies for anxiety, mood, OC-spectrum and traumatic stress disorders. Dr. Baker was previously awarded a Livingston Fellowship for Young Investigators from Harvard Medical School to conduct research on anxiety sensitivity and suicidality in OC-spectrum and anxiety disorders. She has numerous published peer-reviewed papers and chapters on these topics. 

Dr. Baker and ADAA

 “I joined ADAA in grad school in 2010 as the organization is extremely well aligned with my clinical and research interests. I am continually impressed by the multidisciplinary approaches used and presented by ADAA researchers and clinicians. The annual conferences are a highlight for me! I first went to the conference in 2010 and have been every year since. I have gotten involved in a number of ADAA activities, committees, and award programs outside of general membership which have been invaluable to me. One specific example comes from the CDLP program which I participated in in 2016 and helped me to refine a grant proposal which was subsequently funded!”

Dr. Amanda Baker is a research and clinical psychologist and Clinical Director at the Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders in the Psychiatry Department at Massachusetts General Hospital and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School where she has worked since 2013. Dr. Baker received her Ph.D. from Boston University in 2013 and completed her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Dr. Baker is an active member of Anxiety and Depression Association of America where she is vice-chair of the Early Career Special Interest Group. Dr. Baker's clinical and research interests focus on the development, validation, and dissemination of empirically based psychosocial treatments for anxiety and related disorders. She has a current NARSAD Young Investigator Award from the Brain and Behavior Foundation examining the use of ecological momentary assessment and wearable psychophysiological assessment to develop intra-individual networks of panic disorder and assess change in CBT."

Alex Bettis, PhD

Alex Bettis PhD

Alex Bettis, PhD, is a second-year postdoctoral fellow in the Child Mental Health T32 program at Brown Medical School, and she will be starting a new position this fall as an Assistant Professor in the Psychiatry department at Vanderbilt Medical School. Alex received her PhD from Vanderbilt University in 2018, and she completed her predoctoral clinical internship at UCLA Semel Institute in the general child track. Her clinical and research interests are in the treatment and prevention of internalizing disorders and suicidality in adolescents. Alex has been a member of ADAA for several years, including attending the conference as a part of the Ailes Muskin Career Development Leadership Program in 2019.  

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