by Neal Sideman

I have chosen to focus on my healing, and to say only a few words about my long period of suffering. Chances are, you already know – firsthand or secondhand – more than you'd care  to know about the suffering! My own suffering had its unique form, but essentially, it was no different from what you probably already know.

After my first two panic attacks, I awakened each morning to an instantly racing heart, hyperventilation, and cresting waves of fear and apprehension. My range of activity for each day was dictated by my agoraphobia, and my range gradually got narrower and narrower.

Every aspect of my life was deeply affected. Once, a friend asked me to explain what things I couldn't do. I answered that it would take much less time if I simply listed those things I could do.

At my low point, I was buffeted from morning to night by waves of panic anxiety, and I was barely able to venture one block from my apartment.

To summarize a story that could fill many pages, I spent years doing everything I could to heal from this condition. After many disappointments, my tenacity finally paid off. I found my answer.

The answer I found was the deeply transformational process of learning mastery over my panic and anxiety.

For me, there were two keys to learning this mastery and curing this condition: education and practice.

Read the rest of Neal's story on his website. 

"A friend asked me to explain what things I couldn't do. I answered that it would take much less time if I simply listed those things I could do."
Disorder

Comments

I've been searching the web for about 2 years and I've read every success story there is, my thing is what about the people who need the help but have no money are no insurance I want help but there is no help unless you have a pocket full of money every story begins with what to do how to do it and then the big $$$$$$$$$ comes

Hi Natalie,
I haven't fully recovered from agoraphobia; I still struggle with traveling in the car and on planes. However, if you're housebound, there is a book that might help - "Simple, Effective Treatment of Agoraphobia" by Claire Weekes. It's an old book, the language is a little outdated and the author is no longer alive, but it's one of the best I've read so far. She shares the stories of people that were agoraphobic for 10-20+ years and still managed to recover.

The short version of every recovery material out there is basically this:
-Face the fear over and over again in a systematic way, in small steps until you can do bigger and bigger things
-Try to do it while calm so as not to reinforce the fear
-Let time pass as your nervous system slowly calms down

You don't necessarily have to have a therapist - a calm person that can accompany you and remain calm while you are anxious can be incredibly helpful. There are also affordable therapists online, if you haven't looked into online therapy, I would strongly advise it. Social support was one of the strongest contributors to me getting better, you may be able to do it alone, but it will be far more difficult.