Welcome to ADAA

Founded in 1979, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention, treatment, and cure of anxiety, depression, OCD, PTSD, and co-occurring disorders through education, practice, and research. With more than 1,500 professional mental health members (many of whom contribute blog posts, host webinars, review website content and more) ADAA is a leader in education, training, and research. More than 11 million people from around the world visit the ADAA website annually (and click on more than 19,000,000 pages)  to find current treatment and evidence-based research information and to access free resources and support. Together we are changing lives.  Welcome!


 

ADAA News, Member Publications and More...

Check out this month's free issue for helpful resources to help you or a loved one manage anxiety or depression.  New personal stories of triumph, ADAA Ally stories, new member blog posts, webinars and media placements.
A coping toolbox is essentially a box filled with items and notes of coping strategies to help oneself calm down and express their emotions in a healthy way. ADAA President Luana Marques, PhD recommends creating a note with a quote that gives you hope or a card that says "I need to charge up" or "I need to go for a walk." 
The fear of vomiting can become so all-consuming and terrifying that eating becomes a struggle and weight loss becomes dangerous. As sufferers try to protect themselves from throwing up, their world shrinks until it becomes impossible to work, go to school, or to socialize. This was Kay prior to treatment. In this live free webinar, Ken Goodman, author of The Emetophobia Manual, interviews Kay, one of his former patients. Together they discuss her remarkable healing journey and how she freed herself from the fear of vomit and reclaimed her life. This webinar will be presented live giving viewers a chance to be a part of the conversation with plenty of time to ask questions of both guests. This is a unique opportunity to hear from the perspective of a therapist and a patient as you learn the key components to change and success. The webinar is the second of a two-part series and it is recommended that you watch part one prior to watching part two. 
Like stress, anxiety can be useful in the right scenarios. It is the byproduct of what psychologist Stephen Porges calls “our biological imperative toward safety.” The discomfort it makes us feel was designed to alert us of something, precisely so that we listen up and protect ourselves. Luana Marques, an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and president of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America told me, “Although anxiety is uncomfortable, it may signal that something’s not working. [Imagine] if you didn’t have pain receptors and you touched a hot surface — you would burn. Anxiety has that same protective factor that tells you ‘I need to do something differently.’”