by Lynne Siqueland, PhD

Parents can't be constant companions, teachers or saints at this time. You can be enough.

  • It’s not possible to be a really good parent now - aim for good enough for you and your kids.

by Aarti Gupta, PsyD

Since the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a global pandemic, many of us, even those who have not been infected by the virus, will choose to quarantine in our homes for the upcoming weeks.

by Richa Bhatia, MD, FAPA

Fear, uncertainty, and anxiety are bound to be heightened with wide-scale disease outbreaks that are contagious, particularly when they involve a new, previously unknown disease-causing agent, as is the case with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

by Jesse Spiegel, PsyD

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) often wears down children and parents.  Prior to beginning treatment, parents often state that they can no longer understand or recognize their child.  They see their child as being rigid, stuck, and exhausting.

by Shane Owens, Ph.D., ABPP and David Cennimo MD, FACP, FAAP, FIDSA

Checking my email last night, I noticed that “coronavirus” appeared in the subject line of about 70% of the messages.

by Mitchell Greene, PhD

Most of us started out playing sports for fun. Practices and games were a chance to meet up with friends (old and new), to get away from our work-a-day lives, and take on an athletic challenge that got our hearts pumping and our endorphins firing.  

by Kama Jensen, MEd, LPCC

Did you know the inability to experience your emotions causes anxious sensations? But that does not mean it's part of an anxiety condition. 

by Ken Goodman, LCSW

It’s easy to feel unsettled when we hear unsettling news on television or social media, particularly when several events happen at once.

by Dave Carbonell, PhD

ADAA member Dave Carbonell, PhD wrote this blog post to accompany his new ADAA webinar. 

“The harder I try, the worst it gets!”

by Deborah Roth Ledley, PhD

When a baby arrives, gifts are most often given to the new little bundle of joy rather than to the new parents.  Parents might find their homes heaped with adorable onesies, brightly colored chew toys, and board book editions of childhood favorites.  What do new parents need?

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