by Lynne S. Gots, PhD

In the past few weeks, two people have contacted me seeking help for “real-Iife OCD.” I had never heard the term before, which is surprising because I am an OCD specialist. I spend roughly 75-80% of my clinical hours working with people who have OCD.

by Debra Kissen, PhD, M.H.S.A. and Paul Greene, PhD

Death by suicide is a major public health problem that profoundly impacts families in a way few other things do. Every year, many people at risk of suicide seek and get help, potentially saving themselves and their loved ones untold grief.

by Patrick McGrath, PhD

My newest way to explain OCD to a patient and family.

by Patricia Thornton, PhD

One of the more difficult symptoms of OCD that my patients deal with is the presence of mental compulsions.

by Jon Hershfield, MFT

You can do pretty much anything you want in this life except willingly or carelessly harm others. Of all of the demands society places on us, to be hygienic, to stay healthy, to be organized and strive for protection...

by Kimberly Morrow, LCSW

I presented a complex case recently at the Anxiety and Depression Association of America that challenged my clinical skills, but more importantly, deeply affected the quality of life of the person I was treating.

by Lynne Gots, PhD

I’ve had this terrible thought I can’t get out of my head. I saw a post on Facebook from a girl I met at a party in college and remembered an incident from ten years ago. We were both pretty drunk and started fooling around.  I went back to her room, and we ended up having sex.

by Katie D. Kriegshauser, PhD

People with OCD see on average three to four doctors over nine years before receiving a correct diagnosis. Having it finally named may offer some sense of relief— once a condition’s identified, you can get down to properly treating it, right? Well…yes and no. 

by Michelle Witkin, PhD

Katrina was excited. She, her sister, Maia, and their mother were on the way to the park to play handball. Suddenly, Maia screamed and collapsed on the ground, wailing. “A fly landed on me! A fly landed on me!” Her mother tried to calm Maia down, but with no success.

by Jonathan Grayson, PhD and Jenny Yip, PsyD, ABPP

On February 7, 2019, ADAA held a Twitter chat under the title #GotOCD. ADAA member experts Jonathan Grayson, PhD and Jenny Yip, PsyD, ABPP answered questions on the different types of OCD and treatment. Read the Q&A below:
 

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