How to Talk with Your Kids About Violence: Response to the Las Vegas Shooting

How to Talk with Your Kids About Violence: Response to the Las Vegas Shooting

Sheila Rauch, PhD, ABPP - ADAA Board Member

Member Since 2002

Sheila A.M. Rauch, Ph.D., ABPP, led design and now serves as Deputy Director of the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program and Director of Mental Health Research and Program Evaluation at the VA Atlanta Healthcare System. Dr. Rauch has been developing programs, conducting research and providing PTSD and Anxiety Disorders treatment for over 20 years. Her research focuses on examination of mechanisms involved in the development and treatment of PTSD and improving access to effective interventions. She has led several PTSD treatment outcome and mechanisms trials funded through VA/DOD and other sources and has been training providers in PTSD treatment since 2000 including working with a team to establish a PTSD training network in Japan following the triple disaster in 2011. She has published scholarly articles, chapters, and books on anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) focusing on neurobiology and factors involved in the development, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety disorders, psychosocial factors in medical settings, and the relation between physical health and anxiety. She is an author of the second edition of the Prolonged Exposure manual and patient workbook as well as the PE for Intensive outpatient programs manuals.  Dr. Rauch has been involved in the modification and adaptation of proven psychotherapeutic interventions for anxiety disorders for various populations and settings, including primary care. She is a fellow of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy (ABCT), was granted membership in the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and serves as a member of the Board of Directors and Scientific Council of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.  

 Dr. Rauch and ADAA

"I joined ADAA in my first year as a professional psychologist as the organization was a good fit for my budding academic medical career. ADAA was the exceptional organization that included mental health professional from all types of practice as well as patients and their families.  The goal to push science, practice, and recovery was wholly in line with my perspective.  The Scientific preconference had a very good reputation for providing the highest quality of scientific research on anxiety disorders and the quality spilled over into the conference.

The multidisciplinary atmosphere of the organization that provides space and value to all scientific practice to support those suffering with mental health issues.

ADAA helps me to get out of my comfort zone to see what is happening in the larger mental health field. As a clinical researcher, I can easily get stuck in my perspective and people who practice in the same way as me. ADAA gives me connections to very different type of providers and practices while staying evidence based.”

How to Talk with Your Kids About Violence: Response to the Las Vegas Shooting

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With the deluge of information on this event, it is highly likely that your children, preteens, and teens have heard a lot about the event and may have even seen some of the highly graphic video coverage of the shooting itself and the aftermath.  The key message for parents to convey after exposure to any type of trauma or violence is to ensure that your child feels safe and loved.  

Give them an open invitation to talk with you about the incident.  If your child has seen coverage of the event, make sure you talk with them about what they think about it and how they think it impacts their life and the world around them.  Such discussion should fit the developmental level of the child using the child’s words and understanding as much as possible.  

Make sure the child has a chance to feel the strong emotions that may come up in response this shooting.  Let them know that most people are upset by this type of event and feeling angry and scare and sad is normal when a shooting occurs.  

Normalize the reactions the child may be having. Provide direction that in this case, viewing video coverage of what happened may not be helpful and that they should talk with you if they see something disturbing online. 

Let them know that the feelings they may have will most reduce over time but if they are not getting better with time there are good resources for people who can help with effective treatment available. 

As much as parents can provide a clear sense of safety for their children this will help to reduce the impact of the event.  Consider talking about what they think happened, how they feel about what happened, and what they think needs to happen now to prevent this from happening again.  

 

Sheila Rauch, PhD, ABPP - ADAA Board Member

Member Since 2002

Sheila A.M. Rauch, Ph.D., ABPP, led design and now serves as Deputy Director of the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program and Director of Mental Health Research and Program Evaluation at the VA Atlanta Healthcare System. Dr. Rauch has been developing programs, conducting research and providing PTSD and Anxiety Disorders treatment for over 20 years. Her research focuses on examination of mechanisms involved in the development and treatment of PTSD and improving access to effective interventions. She has led several PTSD treatment outcome and mechanisms trials funded through VA/DOD and other sources and has been training providers in PTSD treatment since 2000 including working with a team to establish a PTSD training network in Japan following the triple disaster in 2011. She has published scholarly articles, chapters, and books on anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) focusing on neurobiology and factors involved in the development, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety disorders, psychosocial factors in medical settings, and the relation between physical health and anxiety. She is an author of the second edition of the Prolonged Exposure manual and patient workbook as well as the PE for Intensive outpatient programs manuals.  Dr. Rauch has been involved in the modification and adaptation of proven psychotherapeutic interventions for anxiety disorders for various populations and settings, including primary care. She is a fellow of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy (ABCT), was granted membership in the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and serves as a member of the Board of Directors and Scientific Council of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.  

 Dr. Rauch and ADAA

"I joined ADAA in my first year as a professional psychologist as the organization was a good fit for my budding academic medical career. ADAA was the exceptional organization that included mental health professional from all types of practice as well as patients and their families.  The goal to push science, practice, and recovery was wholly in line with my perspective.  The Scientific preconference had a very good reputation for providing the highest quality of scientific research on anxiety disorders and the quality spilled over into the conference.

The multidisciplinary atmosphere of the organization that provides space and value to all scientific practice to support those suffering with mental health issues.

ADAA helps me to get out of my comfort zone to see what is happening in the larger mental health field. As a clinical researcher, I can easily get stuck in my perspective and people who practice in the same way as me. ADAA gives me connections to very different type of providers and practices while staying evidence based.”

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