5 Ways to Increase Visibility and Advance Your Career Using Social Media

5 Ways to Increase Visibility and Advance Your Career Using Social Media

Krystal Lewis, PhD - ADAA Board Member

Member Since 2011

Krystal Lewis, PhD is a clinical psychologist with the Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience (SDAN) at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). In addition, she is a member of the Stigma Scientific Interest Group (SIG) and the Anti-Racism Task Force at NIH. She specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric anxiety and has interest in identifying mechanisms of treatment for anxiety disorders in youth. Dr. Lewis has experience in delivering evidence-based therapies and collaborating with schools, families, and providers to disseminate scientific information which helps inform clinical practice and promote implementation of evidence-based treatments.

Dr. Lewis has been an active member of ADAA since 2008. She was selected for the competitive Alies Muskin Career Development Leadership Program (CDLP) in 2015 and is an ADAA Clinical Fellow. She has also held leadership positions within ADAA, previously serving as co-chair of the Early Career Professionals and Student SIG and currently serving as co-chair of the Child and Adolescent SIG and was named to the ADAA Board of Directors in 2021.

Dr. Lewis and ADAA

“My graduate school advisor, Thomas H. Ollendick, encouraged his students to join ADAA and doing so was such a great decision. ADAA has been my professional home since 2008 and during that time I have presented posters and talks at the annual conferences, participated in the Career Development Leadership program (CDLP), co-chaired Special Interests Groups (SIG), mentored with the CDLP, and volunteered to help with several other endeavors. ADAA is an amazing organization and a provides great opportunities for young professionals to volunteer, network, and experience immense professional growth. I’m excited to continue working with ADAA as my own professional goals align nicely with the organizations mission.

I really enjoy the collaboration with professionals around the country. ADAA provides an opportunity to learn about research by attending talks at the conference, participating in webinars, and reading about new insights via email or social media. I especially enjoy the relationships that have developed from participating with the different SIGs. The Child and Adolescent SIG has monthly peer consultation calls which allows us to engage with specialists within our organization and obtain clinical consultation for challenging, unique cases. It’s a space for clinicians at all stages of development to talk with one another, share insightful tips and tools, and be part of a community of providers who are passionate about providing the best clinical care to children and adolescents.

Being an active ADAA member contributes to my work in a variety of ways. I have at hand a group of professionals whom I can call on when I need clinical advice, researchers who I can collaborate with on projects or involve in SIG meetings to present their work, and a professional home where I feel most comfortable. I encourage students and trainees to join this organization which will contribute to their professional growth and maintain their excitement about their work.”

5 Ways to Increase Visibility and Advance Your Career Using Social Media

Share
Yes

You may already feel overwhelmed by reading the title of this blog! How do I keep up with the changing trends and use social media effectively to promote myself? It’s easy to use social media as a form of entertainment, to post personal pictures and videos, and to connect with others who have similar interests. But, when it comes to having a professional presence on-line, it can be difficult to know where to start. Social media is a great tool for advertising your personal brand, moving up in your field, promoting your practice, demonstrating your expertise, and can even help you land the right job. Here are some ways to use social media to advance your career:  

  1. Become familiar with the different social media platforms available for use: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram, ResearchGate to name a few. An article published in the NYT highlights the different media platforms and provides a comprehensive overview. It is important to know the pros and cons of each platform and how to best maximize available resources. 
  2. Determine how you want to use your social media platform: Figuring out whether you want to create a profile that strictly focuses on your professional endeavors or whether you want to also incorporate your personal interests and commitments is an important step. It may be easiest to create a new social media page that focuses on you as a professional and separates personal posts (pictures, videos, comments on unrelated topics, etc.). Some people have both personal and professional pages while others phase out their personal page and strictly use a professional page. Be aware of company policies about the use of social media if you don’t work for yourself. You may need to separate yourself and your brand from the institution/corporation that you work for. 
  3. Create a professional bio that can be used on each platform: Different social media sites may have specific word and character limits so make sure to adapt each bio appropriately. As an example, the muse posted an article that contains some tips on writing a professional bio for social media sites, such as Linkedin, versus for a company website. 
  4. Build a community by posting on topics of value to your intended audience: Try not to focus on followers and the number of likes. Instead, establish a group of followers who will share your posts and engage in conversations about the topic at hand. Post articles relevant to your interest and also ones that are insightful, humorous, and highlight who you are as a professional.  Keep in mind for each promotional post that you make (regarding your accomplishments, services, business, etc.) it is recommended that you have 6 other content posts to ensure that you are not over-promoting yourself. Emphasize content related to your specialty area and that your audience can appreciate. 
  5. Consistently post to increase visibility: Using social media to promote your career is an ongoing commitment. Frequent posting is essential to generate traffic to your page. Adding reminders on your calendar can help to keep you organized and on schedule to post regularly. This requires you to not only post on your own page, but to comment on relevant pages, share related videos and pictures that promote your beliefs and values, and requires you to stay well-informed of the current events in your particular field of study.

Social media changes frequently so it is important to keep up with the transformations by optimizing your use of the tools available to you. Using social media can help increase your overall impact and help you make lasting connections with professionals in your field of interest.

Krystal Lewis, PhD - ADAA Board Member

Member Since 2011

Krystal Lewis, PhD is a clinical psychologist with the Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience (SDAN) at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). In addition, she is a member of the Stigma Scientific Interest Group (SIG) and the Anti-Racism Task Force at NIH. She specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric anxiety and has interest in identifying mechanisms of treatment for anxiety disorders in youth. Dr. Lewis has experience in delivering evidence-based therapies and collaborating with schools, families, and providers to disseminate scientific information which helps inform clinical practice and promote implementation of evidence-based treatments.

Dr. Lewis has been an active member of ADAA since 2008. She was selected for the competitive Alies Muskin Career Development Leadership Program (CDLP) in 2015 and is an ADAA Clinical Fellow. She has also held leadership positions within ADAA, previously serving as co-chair of the Early Career Professionals and Student SIG and currently serving as co-chair of the Child and Adolescent SIG and was named to the ADAA Board of Directors in 2021.

Dr. Lewis and ADAA

“My graduate school advisor, Thomas H. Ollendick, encouraged his students to join ADAA and doing so was such a great decision. ADAA has been my professional home since 2008 and during that time I have presented posters and talks at the annual conferences, participated in the Career Development Leadership program (CDLP), co-chaired Special Interests Groups (SIG), mentored with the CDLP, and volunteered to help with several other endeavors. ADAA is an amazing organization and a provides great opportunities for young professionals to volunteer, network, and experience immense professional growth. I’m excited to continue working with ADAA as my own professional goals align nicely with the organizations mission.

I really enjoy the collaboration with professionals around the country. ADAA provides an opportunity to learn about research by attending talks at the conference, participating in webinars, and reading about new insights via email or social media. I especially enjoy the relationships that have developed from participating with the different SIGs. The Child and Adolescent SIG has monthly peer consultation calls which allows us to engage with specialists within our organization and obtain clinical consultation for challenging, unique cases. It’s a space for clinicians at all stages of development to talk with one another, share insightful tips and tools, and be part of a community of providers who are passionate about providing the best clinical care to children and adolescents.

Being an active ADAA member contributes to my work in a variety of ways. I have at hand a group of professionals whom I can call on when I need clinical advice, researchers who I can collaborate with on projects or involve in SIG meetings to present their work, and a professional home where I feel most comfortable. I encourage students and trainees to join this organization which will contribute to their professional growth and maintain their excitement about their work.”

Use of Website Blog Commenting

Use of Website Blog Commenting

ADAA provides this Website blogs for the benefit of its members and the public. The content, view and opinions published in Blogs written by our personnel or contributors – or from links or posts on the Website from other sources - belong solely to their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of ADAA, its members, management or employees. Any comments or opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors only. Please remember that the open and real-time nature of the comments posted to these venues makes it is impossible for ADAA to confirm the validity of any content posted, and though we reserve the right to review and edit or delete any such comment, we do not guarantee that we will monitor or review it. As such, we are not responsible for any messages posted or the consequences of following any advice offered within such posts. If you find any posts in these posts/comments to be offensive, inaccurate or objectionable, please contact us via email at [email protected] and reference the relevant content. If we determine that removal of a post or posts is necessary, we will make reasonable efforts to do so in a timely manner.

ADAA expressly disclaims responsibility for and liabilities resulting from, any information or communications from and between users of ADAA’s blog post commenting features. Users acknowledge and agree that they may be individually liable for anything they communicate using ADAA’s blogs, including but not limited to defamatory, discriminatory, false or unauthorized information. Users are cautioned that they are responsible for complying with the requirements of applicable copyright and trademark laws and regulations. By submitting a response, comment or content, you agree that such submission is non-confidential for all purposes. Any submission to this Website will be deemed and remain the property of ADAA.

The ADAA blogs are forums for individuals to share their opinions, experiences and thoughts related to mental illness. ADAA wants to ensure the integrity of this service and therefore, use of this service is limited to participants who agree to adhere to the following guidelines:

1. Refrain from transmitting any message, information, data, or text that is unlawful, threatening, abusive, harassing, defamatory, vulgar, obscene, that may be invasive of another 's privacy, hateful, or bashing communications - especially those aimed at gender, race, color, sexual orientation, national origin, religious views or disability.

Please note that there is a review process whereby all comments posted to blog posts and webinars are reviewed by ADAA staff to determine appropriateness before comments are posted. ADAA reserves the right to remove or edit a post containing offensive material as defined by ADAA.

ADAA reserves the right to remove or edit posts that contain explicit, obscene, offensive, or vulgar language. Similarly, posts that contain any graphic files will be removed immediately upon notice.

2. Refrain from posting or transmitting any unsolicited, promotional materials, "junk mail," "spam," "chain mail," "pyramid schemes" or any other form of solicitation. ADAA reserves the right to delete these posts immediately upon notice.

3. ADAA invites and encourages a healthy exchange of opinions. If you disagree with a participant 's post or opinion and wish to challenge it, do so with respect. The real objective of the ADAA blog post commenting function is to promote discussion and understanding, not to convince others that your opinion is "right." Name calling, insults, and personal attacks are not appropriate and will not be tolerated. ADAA will remove these posts immediately upon notice.

4. ADAA promotes privacy and encourages participants to keep personal information such as address and telephone number from being posted. Similarly, do not ask for personal information from other participants. Any comments that ask for telephone, address, e-mail, surveys and research studies will not be approved for posting.

5. Participants should be aware that the opinions, beliefs and statements on blog posts do not necessarily represent the opinions and beliefs of ADAA. Participants also agree that ADAA is not to be held liable for any loss or injury caused, in whole or in part, by sponsorship of blog post commenting. Participants also agree that ADAA reserves the right to report any suspicions of harm to self or others as evidenced by participant posts.

Advertisement