Understanding Complex Cases

Understanding Complex Cases

Kimberly Morrow, LCSW

headshot

Kimberly Morrow is a licensed clinical social worker in private practice in Erie, Pennsylvania. Graduating from Memphis State University with a Master’s in Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with a Master’s in Social Work, Kimberly has been specializing in treating people with anxiety and OCD for over 25 years and teaching other professionals how to treat anxiety for over 15 years. Kimberly is a graduate of the International Obsessive Compulsive Foundation’s Behavior Therapy Institute. She is a board member of the Obsessive Compulsive Foundation of Western Pennsylvania and an active member of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, serving on many committees. Kimberly has developed training videos to help clinicians learn evidenced based treatment for anxiety and OCD, http://www.adaa.org/treating-anxiety-disorders-part-1-6-power-anxiety. She is the 2012 recipient of the Clinician Outreach Award and the 2015 Member of Distinction Award from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. She is the author of Face It and Feel It: 10 Simple But Not Easy Ways to Live Well With Anxiety (2011). www.livingwellwithanxiety.com

Understanding Complex Cases

Share
Yes

I presented a complex case recently at the Anxiety and Depression Association of America that challenged my clinical skills, but more importantly, deeply affected the quality of life of the person I was treating. It is always an honor to walk alongside my clients on their journey to living well with anxiety and OCD. This particular person struggled from a trauma he experienced when he was young and from there he developed severe OCD with themes of harming, responsibility, and perfectionism. I am happy to say he is living his life fully now. After processing his grief, he learned how to challenge his beliefs about being responsible for the trauma. He also learned to both hold his capacity to be gentle and caring as well as his ability to have thoughts about harming others. He was able to improve his ability to tolerate distressing thoughts and feelings. He became a pro at leaning into his fears rather than avoiding them.

I also learned quite a bit from him. Here are my takeaways. I hope they may help you in your next complex case:

  1. The importance of the therapeutic relationship.
  2. The need for flexibility in treatment-having to constantly assess the situation and change course if necessary.
  3. Using our tool box- we have a lot in it and sometimes we need to use it all: Customization, different treatment modalities, family therapists, more intensive resources.
  4. Our own need for support during complex cases- consultation with colleagues.
  5. Needing to try novel treatments-sometimes being creative or adding complementary/intergrative treatments can be the thing that turns things around.
  6. Using the structure of CBT as an anchor throughout our journey was helpful to both the client and myself.

Kimberly Morrow, LCSW

headshot

Kimberly Morrow is a licensed clinical social worker in private practice in Erie, Pennsylvania. Graduating from Memphis State University with a Master’s in Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with a Master’s in Social Work, Kimberly has been specializing in treating people with anxiety and OCD for over 25 years and teaching other professionals how to treat anxiety for over 15 years. Kimberly is a graduate of the International Obsessive Compulsive Foundation’s Behavior Therapy Institute. She is a board member of the Obsessive Compulsive Foundation of Western Pennsylvania and an active member of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, serving on many committees. Kimberly has developed training videos to help clinicians learn evidenced based treatment for anxiety and OCD, http://www.adaa.org/treating-anxiety-disorders-part-1-6-power-anxiety. She is the 2012 recipient of the Clinician Outreach Award and the 2015 Member of Distinction Award from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. She is the author of Face It and Feel It: 10 Simple But Not Easy Ways to Live Well With Anxiety (2011). www.livingwellwithanxiety.com

Use of Website Blog Commenting

Use of Website Blog Commenting

ADAA provides this Website blogs for the benefit of its members and the public. The content, view and opinions published in Blogs written by our personnel or contributors – or from links or posts on the Website from other sources - belong solely to their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of ADAA, its members, management or employees. Any comments or opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors only. Please remember that the open and real-time nature of the comments posted to these venues makes it is impossible for ADAA to confirm the validity of any content posted, and though we reserve the right to review and edit or delete any such comment, we do not guarantee that we will monitor or review it. As such, we are not responsible for any messages posted or the consequences of following any advice offered within such posts. If you find any posts in these posts/comments to be offensive, inaccurate or objectionable, please contact us via email at [email protected] and reference the relevant content. If we determine that removal of a post or posts is necessary, we will make reasonable efforts to do so in a timely manner.

ADAA expressly disclaims responsibility for and liabilities resulting from, any information or communications from and between users of ADAA’s blog post commenting features. Users acknowledge and agree that they may be individually liable for anything they communicate using ADAA’s blogs, including but not limited to defamatory, discriminatory, false or unauthorized information. Users are cautioned that they are responsible for complying with the requirements of applicable copyright and trademark laws and regulations. By submitting a response, comment or content, you agree that such submission is non-confidential for all purposes. Any submission to this Website will be deemed and remain the property of ADAA.

The ADAA blogs are forums for individuals to share their opinions, experiences and thoughts related to mental illness. ADAA wants to ensure the integrity of this service and therefore, use of this service is limited to participants who agree to adhere to the following guidelines:

1. Refrain from transmitting any message, information, data, or text that is unlawful, threatening, abusive, harassing, defamatory, vulgar, obscene, that may be invasive of another 's privacy, hateful, or bashing communications - especially those aimed at gender, race, color, sexual orientation, national origin, religious views or disability.

Please note that there is a review process whereby all comments posted to blog posts and webinars are reviewed by ADAA staff to determine appropriateness before comments are posted. ADAA reserves the right to remove or edit a post containing offensive material as defined by ADAA.

ADAA reserves the right to remove or edit posts that contain explicit, obscene, offensive, or vulgar language. Similarly, posts that contain any graphic files will be removed immediately upon notice.

2. Refrain from posting or transmitting any unsolicited, promotional materials, "junk mail," "spam," "chain mail," "pyramid schemes" or any other form of solicitation. ADAA reserves the right to delete these posts immediately upon notice.

3. ADAA invites and encourages a healthy exchange of opinions. If you disagree with a participant 's post or opinion and wish to challenge it, do so with respect. The real objective of the ADAA blog post commenting function is to promote discussion and understanding, not to convince others that your opinion is "right." Name calling, insults, and personal attacks are not appropriate and will not be tolerated. ADAA will remove these posts immediately upon notice.

4. ADAA promotes privacy and encourages participants to keep personal information such as address and telephone number from being posted. Similarly, do not ask for personal information from other participants. Any comments that ask for telephone, address, e-mail, surveys and research studies will not be approved for posting.

5. Participants should be aware that the opinions, beliefs and statements on blog posts do not necessarily represent the opinions and beliefs of ADAA. Participants also agree that ADAA is not to be held liable for any loss or injury caused, in whole or in part, by sponsorship of blog post commenting. Participants also agree that ADAA reserves the right to report any suspicions of harm to self or others as evidenced by participant posts.

Advertisement