Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Eligibility Criteria
  • Have no history of bipolar disorder, a psychotic disorder, or substance dependence
  • Are in good physical health
  • Have not already had more than 30 hrs of CBT for OCD
  • Are right-handed
  • Between the ages of 18 and 65
  • Either not taking psychiatric medications or on a stable dose of a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (only) for at least 12 weeks
State
California

This study is investigating what, if any, changes in brain chemistry take place in adults with OCD as a result of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). We will measure amounts and distribution of glutamate in the brain using MRSI (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging) scans before and after 4 weeks of CBT.

The study offers:

New OCD Treatment Research

Research is ongoing to learn more about OCD and to develop new types of treatment, such as deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant OCD and high-intensity radiation for people with severe OCD symptoms.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

Treatment for OCD

The two types of treatment for OCD are cognitive-behavioral therapy, or CBT, and medication. For some people, a combination may be the most effective treatment. Exposure and response prevention, or ERP, is often the most effective form of CBT.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

OCD in Adults

The essential features of adult OCD are recurrent, unwanted obsessions or compulsions that are severe enough to be time consuming; that is, they take more than one hour a day — or they cause marked distress or significant impairment in your daily life.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)

OCD in Children

Most children with OCD are diagnosed around age 10, although the disorder can strike children as young as 2 or 3. Boys are more likely to develop OCD before puberty, while girls tend to develop it during adolescence. Unlike adults, children do not always realize that their obsessions and compulsions are excessive.

Funding for this video provided by a grant from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP)